Tornadoes Across The Country

​While the peak months for tornadoes are April to June, several destructive storm systems have already caused damage across parts of the southern U.S., including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas.
 

This year is predicted to be an active tornado year, and several outbreaks occurred even before Meteorological Spring on March 1. This is attributed, in part, to a waning La Niña.

“During the La Nina and especially when it is transitioning into a neutral phase, the potential for increased severe weather events and above-average tornado activity is in place.”

 

Popular Science magazine says, “The new predictions put the number of tornadoes for 2022 at around 1,350 to 1,475, above a yearly average of 1,253. April is supposed to be particularly busy with a predicted 200 to 275 storms (last year in April there were just 73). But the big takeaway is that they’ll likely hit places outside of what’s traditionally been known as ‘Tornado Alley.’”
 

Central plains states like Oklahoma still have tornadoes but researchers have discovered that statistically, tornado activity is shifting to the southeastern parts of the U.S.

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The extent of the damage has not been ascertained in all locations. As more information emerges, the situation will be clarified.

However, below are common issues that are raised after a disaster.


Clean Up:
Cleaning, repairing and rebuilding of damaged homes and businesses. This includes debris clean-up, which may be significant because of the downed power lines and trees, as well as the number of vehicles, appliances and furniture lost in the tornadoes. All the latter will also need to be replaced.

 

Cash Assistance:
A critical ongoing need will be unrestricted cash donations to support affected individuals and families. Direct cash assistance can allow families to secure emergency housing, purchase items and contract services locally that address their multiple needs. It gives each family flexibility and choice, ensuring that support is relevant, cost-effective and timely. Cash assistance can also help move families faster towards rebuilding their lives.


Emotional and spiritual care:
Emotional and spiritual care will be critical, especially for families of people killed in the storms, first responders and those on the tornadoes’ direct paths. Long-term mental health and trauma support will also be required. Some of the affected communities – especially in Louisiana – have been impacted by numerous events, including Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Isaac and Ida. This has left them with increased trauma from natural hazards.


Long Term Recovery:
In addition to immediate response, long-term recovery needs will include rebuilding and fixing homes and community infrastructure to secure economic recovery. The tornadoes have affected people from all walks of life, some with insurance and others without. The destruction of mobile homes will also affect affordable housing availability in those communities.

If you can help, please help. 

 

Thank you